History 

Entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in History
If the subject has not been studied at GCSE: GCSE grade 6 in English Language or English Literature

CONTENT

We offer two routes through A-level History, each leading to qualification at A-level.

Early modern history

This is an ideal option for students who would like to build on their study of Henry VIII at GCSE and to broaden their historical knowledge. We cover the reigns of Henry VIII’s children: Edward VI, Mary and Elizabeth I, analysing their strengths and weaknesses, their achievements and their impact on England. We set this into the context of Europe’s relationship with the wider world, studying exploration and empire, including the origins of the British Empire. We explore the impact of Europeans on Africa, Asia and the Americas, and the way in which this shaped modern Britain and the modern world, including war, trade, disease, piracy and slavery. Students write a personal study on a related topic of their choice.

Modern history

This is an ideal option for students who would like to build on their GCSE course with further study of recent centuries. The course explores the history of the world’s major powers since 1792, allowing students to deepen their understanding of why Britain and the world are as they are today. We study political, social and economic changes in post-war Britain, including the roles of major leaders such as Churchill and Thatcher. We also study the relationship between the world’s major powers in the 20th century, including the causes of the First and Second World Wars, and the changing nature of warfare, including leadership, technology and communication, in the 19th and 20th centuries. Students write a personal study on a related topic of their choice.

ASSESSMENT

A-level is assessed by means of three examinations at the end of Year 13, and a personal study.

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

History is invaluable in broadening students’ knowledge and understanding of the contemporary world and developing their analytical skills. Studying history teaches us to write, to argue, to persuade, to debate, to process information, to weigh up evidence, and to reach conclusions and present these. These skills are highly prized by universities, and by employers in a very wide range of fields, including business, management, journalism and the media, law, politics and the Civil Service, economics, finance and accounting, education, the arts, tourism and heritage.